Alessio Sarri

By experimenting and taming impossible shapes,
Alessio Sarri turned his studio into a lab
and instantly stood out from his fellow potters

The making of a vase for Alessandro Mendini and Maison Matisse by Alessio Sarri

Alessio Sarri

Maison Matisse

Let's take you back to the 1970s. A Fine Arts graduate with his own studio, Alessio Sarri was on course for a fairly anonymous ceramist's career before a paragliding trip changed his life. After flying over Monte Cimone, in Emilia-Romagna, he met Matteo Thun, an architecture enthusiast who took him into the design world by producing a new kind of vase: the Rara Avis. That's when everything changed.
By experimenting and taming impossible shapes, Alessio Sarri turned his studio into a lab and instantly stood out from his fellow potters. He says "they were committed to the endless reproduction of copies of copies" while he wanted to give a patina worthy of an industrial series to handcrafted and totally unique pieces. A signature that brought him together with Ettore Sottsass who loved the vibrations you could only get from objects by Alessio Sarri.

The early 80s saw Alessio living the glory days of the famous Memphis movement. Sottsass aside, his name is still associated as being one of the foremost members along with Nathalie du Pasquier and George J. Sowden.

Just some of the creators whose unique lines Alessio Sarri has put his own spin on. The young generation of designers covet his studio for his talent and ability to make each piece a world of sensitive experiences which is why the designer Alessandro Mendini and Maison Matisse chose it to make three limited-edition vases.

Alessio Sarri making a vase by the designer Alessandro Mendini for Maison Matisse
Alessio Sarri hand-making a Mendini vase for Maison Matisse
Mendini Vase and Maison Matisse by Alessio Sarri